All posts by Virgina Crisp

Bridging the Gap 2017 STEM Education Conference Highlights & Photos

Nearly 500 people from 70 North Carolina counties and nine states attended NCABR’s sixth annual Bridging the Gap: Uniting North Carolina K-16 STEM Education conference Oct. 24-25 in Raleigh.

To view conference photos, click here.

STEM Education Awards

At the 2017 conference, NCABR presented its Distinguished Teaching Award in STEM Education to three North Carolina K-16 educators. The recipients of the award were:

Mary_Samuels

Mary Samuels, a 6th grade science teacher, science department chair and STEM coordinator at Carroll Magnet Middle School in Raleigh. Her nominators praised her embrace of Challenge-Based Learning and the integration of technology into her lessons. As a 2014 Kenan Fellow, Samuels spent a summer working with NC State’s ASSIST Center, which develops nano-sized health monitoring devices, where she developed a curriculum for her students based on her experiences there.

Ben_Owens

Ben Owens, a physics and mathematics teacher at Tri-County Early College High School in Murphy. After a 20-year career as a mechanical engineer with DuPont, he earned a master’s degree in teaching and left the private sector to teach in rural Appalachia. At Tri-County Early College High School, Owens is the lead teacher and coordinator of the school’s Project Based Learning program. Students work in teams with peers in different grade levels on projects of their own choosing that meet required standards.

Ennis

Catherine Ennis, Ph.D., was a professor of curriculum theory and development in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She passed away in April and received the award posthumously. Her research focused on physical education in urban school settings. She received the Distinguished Alumni Award from UNCG’s School of Health and Human Performance in 2009 and this year received the Luther Halsey Gulick Medal for accomplishment, innovation and leadership from the Society of Health and Physical Educators.

NCABR’s Distinguished Teaching Award in STEM Education is designed to recognize higher education faculty and educators at the elementary, middle and high school levels who have made extraordinary contributions to the field of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education.

Attendees at the October 2017 conference were encouraged to apply for the 2018 awards. Those wishing to apply for or to nominate an educator for the 2018 awards should submit an application to NCABR no later than March 30, 2018. Complete details are here.

Conference Agenda Highlights

More than 100 presentations and nearly 140 presenters from across North Carolina and beyond were a part of the 2017 conference. All corners of the STEM education community were represented — including K-12 education, higher education, industry, state government and STEM nonprofits such as museums and educational initiatives. To view the complete conference agenda, click here.

The program included inspiring keynote presentations by:

  • Alizé Carrère, a National Geographic Explorer and cultural ecologist. She spoke about her experiences in the field and about remarkable examples of human adaptation in her talk, “Adapt and Thrive: Living in a Climate Changed World.”
  • Caren Cooper, Ph.D., an associate professor in the Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources at North Carolina State University. She provided a talk, titled “Citizen Science: How Ordinary People are Changing the Face of Discovery,” which addressed how Citizen Science challenges old notions about who can conduct research, where knowledge can be acquired, and even how solutions to some of our biggest societal problems might emerge.
  • Roger Conner, a member of the Coalition for the Public Understanding of Science, a grassroots movement to achieve a national, cultural shift toward increased understanding of what science is, who scientists are, what they do, and why science matters. He facilitated an interactive session, titled: “Science & Society: Myths, Mayhem and Strategic Misunderstandings – What STEM Stakeholders Need to Know.

Scientists who participated in the Science & Society panel discussion were:

  • Martha A. Alexander-Miller, Ph.D., Professor and Chair of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology; Director of the Center for Vaccines at the Extremes of Aging at the Wake Forest School of Medicine.
  • Justin Baumann, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
  • Fred Gould, Ph.D., William Neal Reynolds Professor of Agriculture; Co-Director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University.

Additional program highlights included:

  • Keynote and concurrent presentations  that addressed topics such as public attitudes toward (and knowledge of) STEM; how to engage the public in STEM through citizen science; how to start a STEM program; best practices in undergraduate teaching; developing industry and community connections; reaching low SES (socioeconomic status), rural, urban and minority students; and creating collaborations that explore the interdisciplinary nature of STEM.
  • Hands-on and outreach expo sessions.
  • Dedicated exhibitor area with dozens of booths.
  • “Exhibitor Action Lab” sessions that provide an opportunity for attendees to connect with premium exhibitors and engage in hands-on activities using the most up-to-date STEM resources.
  • Poster sessions that provide conference attendees with updated information about practical, quality STEM research that interests a wide range of subjects.
  • STEM Unconference, which brings together attendees with similar interests for presentations, workshops, demonstrations and discussions.

The 2017 Bridging the Gap conference was sponsored by the Biogen Foundation (presenting sponsor), along with the Burroughs Wellcome Fund; the North Carolina Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education Center; National Geographic Learning and Cengage Learning; Novozymes; the North Carolina Biotechnology Center; Davidson College; UNC Charlotte’s Research and Economic Development & the Charlotte Research Institute; Meredith College; North Carolina A&T State University; and the Appalachian State University Office of Research. Conference partners were the NC State University College of Science’s The Science House; Public Schools of North Carolina; Kenan Fellows Program for Teacher Leadership; and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

NCABR Brings IACUC Training to North Carolina

NCABR held its two-day IACUC 2017 training conference – in collaboration with expert speakers from throughout its membership and the nation – on May 4-5 at the North Carolina Biotechnology Center in Research Triangle Park.

The program, which addressed topics such as regulatory burden, training and competency assessment and the interface of IACUCs and experimental design, drew 98 people from 34 research institutions from North Carolina and nine other states (CT, FL, MA, MD, NY, OH, PA, SC and WI).

The presenting sponsor of the 2017 conference was the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Additional sponsorships were provided by Duke University, East Carolina University, the North Carolina Biotechnology Center and North Carolina Central University.

To view the conference photo gallery, click here. To view the conference agenda, click here.

Teacher Workshop Highlighting NIEHS, MIT Partnership Draws Record Number of Applicants

For the past 23 years, NCABR has partnered with its membership to host one-day K-12 teacher professional development workshops on hot topics relating to bioscience research and careers.

While it is common for most all of the programs in the annual Rx for Science Literacy workshop series to draw 22-25 participants and as many people on a waiting list per program, NCABR workshop coordinators were stunned this winter when 106 teachers registered to attend a workshop on human genetic variation in February. Never before had so many teachers attempted to attend a single program in the annual series, which averages eight workshops per year.

“It took us aback to see such a tremendous outpouring of teachers who were interested in attending a single program,” said NCABR President Suzanne Wilkison of the workshop that took place February 10 at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in Research Triangle Park.

“We have grown accustomed to the programs in the Rx for Science Literacy series having enough teachers on each waiting list to fill a second workshop,” Wilkison said. “To have 75 teachers on a waiting list — enough to fill three additional workshops – in addition to the 31 teachers who actually were able to attend the program is just phenomenal. It speaks to the vital importance of research institutions opening their doors and allowing our educators to visit and learn from their scientists. This is something that just hasn’t diminished over the years – the need for K-12 educators to connect with bioscience researchers to share information that will flow back to our children in the schools.”

Since the workshop series began in 1994, more than 4,660 teachers from 96 of North Carolina’s 100 counties have participated in 255 workshops held throughout the state at dozens of NCABR member research facilities.

The popular Rx for Science Literacy workshop in February featured an NIH curriculum about the basics of human genetics, and it addressed the potential to improve human health and applications for understanding human evolution. The workshop also featured instruction by Dr. Kathleen Vandiver, Director of the Community Outreach and Education Core at the Center for Environmental Health Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Vandiver instructed the teachers using the MIT Egerton Center RNA/DNA curriculum and protein sets, which were developed with a grant from NIEHS.

Vandiver

MIT’s Dr. Kathy Vandiver

“We were grateful for Dr. Vandiver’s willingness to come to North Carolina to work with our educators,” said Regina Williams, NCABR’s Director of Programs, who coordinates all K-12 teacher workshops and programming. “When you have 106 teachers attempt to attend a single workshop, you know there is substantial interest in the science and in the curriculum resources. It’s our mission to make sure our state’s K-12 educators have access to the latest bioscience research content. Our goal going forward is to continue these workshops, and with any hope, bring Dr. Vandiver back to North Carolina to share her expertise with more teachers who may have wanted to participate in her program this past winter but were unable to do so due to capacity limitations.”

Ms. Williams noted the ongoing need for more workshop sponsorships and that those institutions interested in sponsoring a teacher workshop for K-12 educators should contact her at rwilliams@ncabr.org. “We long have been unable to meet teacher demand for our workshops,” Williams said. “It’s a rewarding experience for the scientists, and it’s a valuable exchange of information for all attendees. If you have scientists, then we’ll bring the teachers – as many as you can accommodate. We just never seem to run out of interested educators, even after so many years of running these programs.”

Call for Presenters, Posters Underway for 2017 NCABR STEM Ed Conference

NCABR is accepting applications for session presenters and poster presenters for the 2017 Bridging the Gap K-16 STEM education conference, which will be held October 24-25 at the North Carolina State University McKimmon Conference & Training Center in Raleigh.

STEM stakeholders, including K-12 educators and administrators, higher education faculty and students, and those representing nonprofit organizations, government agencies and other STEM groups, are invited to submit applications to present at the conference.

Presenters are asked to share resources and best-practices in STEM education. Presentations should be interactive and engaging and should foster collaboration between North Carolina’s K-16 STEM education communities.

All submissions are due June 15. To apply to present a session, click here. To apply to present a poster, click here.

To register to attend Bridging the Gap 2017, click here. Early bird registration rates apply until September 1.

Call for Submissions for NCABR K-16 STEM Teaching Award

The following applies to the Bridging the Gap conference to be held on October 24-25, 2017.

SUMMARY
The North Carolina Association for Biomedical Research bestows its Distinguished Teaching Award in STEM Education to one or more recipients in the field of K–16 STEM education each year. The awards are designed to recognize educators at the elementary, middle and high school levels, and higher education faculty who have made extraordinary contributions to the field of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. The number of awards given each year is at the discretion of the Awards and Recognitions Committee.

AWARD
Each award consists of:

  • Complimentary registration to the current year’s Bridging the Gap STEM education conference (registrations will be refunded for awardees who register and pay in advance);
  • $500 cash prize;
  • 1-year NCABR Individual Membership;
  • Recognition and award presentation at the Bridging the Gap conference; and
  • Letter of recognition to the awardee’s administration.

ELIGIBILITY
Definition of an educator:
It is the intent of the NCABR Distinguished Teaching Award in STEM Education to recognize those persons currently responsible for the day-to-day instruction of PK–16 students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. There is an assumption in this scenario that there will be an articulated curriculum and some type of assessment of learning. Therefore, nominees for this award may also include such individuals as teaching specialists, technology integration specialists, etc., for it is the duties and responsibilities of one’s job that define one’s role, rather than one’s title. However, if more than 75 percent of one’s responsibilities do not include the direct instruction of PK–16-age students, then the nomination for this award would not be appropriate.

CRITERIA FOR SELECTION
The criteria to be considered by the committee are:

  • Effective planning skills;
  • Lesson presentation skills;
  • Ability to motivate and challenge students;
  • Professional contribution in science, technology engineering or math (e.g., publications, presentations); and
  • Participation in professional growth activities, leadership roles and involvement at professional meetings and conferences such as Bridging the Gap.

NOMINATION PROCESS
Nominations may be made by any member of the educational community (staff, faculty, administrators or students). Self-nominations are accepted as well. Finalists will be chosen and notified by September 1, 2017, and the winners will be publicly announced at the 2017 Bridging the Gap conference.

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

  • Nomination statement that includes a brief description of the nominee’s job responsibilities, accomplishments and examples of how the nominee meets at least three of the five criteria listed in the “Criteria for Selection” section. The format should adhere to the following guidelines: maximum 1,200 words, 12 pt. size font, Arial or Times New Roman font and 1″ margins.
  • Nominee resume or vitae outlining professional background and experience (including current contact information).
  • (Optional) Nominee’s sample of lesson plans and assessment tools with evidence of success.
  • Letters of recommendation (a minimum of two and maximum of three letters). The letters of recommendation should be from individuals and groups who are familiar with the nominee’s work. Letters should not exceed two pages each and must accompany the submission packet. Letters sent separately will not be considered. When possible, use letterhead. Make sure letters are signed and dated accordingly. Letters should reference nominee’s strengths, accomplishments and highlight his or her teaching or administration methods and experiences that directly connect to the application.

Upon receipt, all nominations become the property of NCABR and will not be returned. Late nomination forms will not be accepted. Completed nomination forms must be received by March 31, 2017. The nomination form and supporting documents may be submitted electronically. Alternatively, the nomination form may be printed and mailed with supporting documents to the address below.

NCABR
Attn: DTA Committee
P.O. Box 19469
Raleigh, NC 27619-9469

Questions
Contact Virginia Crisp at virginia.crisp@ncabr.org or 919-785-1304

 

Bridging the Gap STEM Education Conference

To view conference photos, click here.

More than 400 people from 53 North Carolina counties and five states attended NCABR’s fifth annual Bridging the Gap: Uniting North Carolina K-16 STEM Education conference Oct. 25-26 in Raleigh.

Inaugural STEM Education Awards
At the 2016 conference, NCABR bestowed its first-ever Distinguished Teaching Award in STEM Education to two K-16 educators who work in North Carolina. The inaugural recipients of the award were Rahman Tashakkori, Ph.D., Lowe’s Distinguished Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Appalachian State University; and Joann Blumenfeld, a high school teacher in the Wake County Public School System.

rahman

Rahman Tashakkori, Ph.D., (Appalachian State University) receives the Distinguished Teaching Award in STEM Education from NCABR President Suzanne Wilkison at BTG 2016.

joannJoann Blumenfeld (Wake County Public School System) receives the Distinguished Teaching Award in STEM Education at BTG 2016.

NCABR’s Distinguished Teaching Award in STEM Education is designed to recognize educators at the elementary, middle and high school levels and higher education faculty who have made extraordinary contributions to the field of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education.

Attendees at the October 2016 conference were encouraged to apply for the 2017 awards. Those wishing to nominate an educator for the 2017 awards should submit an application to NCABR no later than March 31, 2017. Complete details are here.

Conference Agenda Highlights
More than 100 presentations and nearly 140 presenters from across North Carolina and beyond were a part of the 2016 conference. All corners of the STEM education community were represented — including K-12 education, higher education, industry, state government and STEM nonprofits such as museums and educational initiatives. To view the complete conference agenda, click here.

The program included inspiring keynote presentations by:

  • Andrew Koch, executive vice president and chief academic leadership and innovation officer for the John N. Gardner Institute for Excellence in Undergraduate Education, who spoke on the topic of Gateway Courses: Barriers to Completion or Pathways to a Better Life?”
  • Amy Podurgal with VitalSmarts, who discussed “The Five Crucial Conversations for Educational Excellence.”
  • Andrés Ruzo, National Geographic Explorer and founder and director of the Boiling River Project, who discussed “Building Bridges: A Nat Geo Explorer’s Take on STEM, Exploration and Making an Impact.”
  • Damon Tweedy, M.D., an assistant professor of psychiatry at Duke University Medical Center, a staff physician at the Durham Veteran Affairs Medical Center, and New York Times bestselling author of the book, Black Man in a White Coat: A Doctor’s Reflections on Race and Medicine, who discussed “STEM Pipeline Diversity: A Remedy for Health Disparities?”

Additional program highlights included:

  • Presentations that addressed topics such as starting a STEM program; best practices in undergraduate teaching; developing industry and community connections; reaching low socioeconomic status, rural, urban and minority students; and creating collaborations that explore the interdisciplinary nature of STEM.
  • Hands-on and outreach expo sessions.
  • A dedicated exhibitor area with dozens of booths.
  • “Exhibitor Showcase” sessions that provided an opportunity for attendees to connect with premium exhibitors and engage in hands-on activities using the most up-to-date STEM resources.
  • Poster sessions that provided conference attendees with updated information about practical, quality STEM research representing a wide range of interests.
  • The STEM Unconference, which brought together attendees with similar interests for presentations, workshops, demonstrations and discussions.

The 2016 Bridging the Gap conference was sponsored by the Biogen Foundation (presenting sponsor), along with the Burroughs Wellcome Fund; the North Carolina Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education Center; National Geographic Learning and Cengage Learning; Novozymes; the North Carolina Biotechnology Center; Davidson College; UNC Charlotte’s Research and Economic Development & the Charlotte Research Institute; Meredith College; N.C. State University College of Science’s The Science House; the Appalachian State University Office of Research; and North Carolina Central University.

NCABR collaborates with Biogen Foundation to assist teachers from economically distressed counties

RALEIGH (Oct. 4, 2016) — The North Carolina Association for Biomedical Research (NCABR) is excited to announce a collaboration with the Biogen Foundation that will send teachers and administrators from some of North Carolina’s most economically distressed counties to this year’s Bridging the Gap STEM education conference for free.

Through the Biogen Scholars Program, the Biogen Foundation is covering registration fees for 30 K-12 teachers and 20 K-12 administrators who work in 16 Tier 1 counties across the state. Tier 1 counties have been deemed North Carolina’s most economically distressed by the state Department of Commerce.

The 30 K-12 teachers who are participating in the Biogen Scholars Program also will receive travel stipends and reimbursement for costs associated with substitute teachers needed during the two-day conference.

“The Biogen Foundation wants to spark a passion for science and STEM fields among students across North Carolina,” said Gena Renfrow, North Carolina administrator of the Biogen Foundation. “We know that investing in our teachers is one of the most important and effective ways to reach our future science leaders.”

Teachers and administrators from the following Tier 1 counties have been selected to participate in the 2016 Biogen Scholars Program: Beaufort; Bertie; Columbus; Edgecombe; Hertford; Jackson; Lenoir; Martin; McDowell; Nash; Pasquotank; Robeson; Rutherford; Scotland; Vance; and Warren.

K-12 teachers and administrators who attend Bridging the Gap also will be eligible to apply for funding for their schools through the Biogen Foundation’s Ignite the Power of STEM program, which provides grants to support STEM education programs and resources.

Bridging the Gap is an annual conference organized by NCABR. It brings together representatives from K-12 education, higher education, industry, state and local government, and other groups, such as museums and economic development nonprofits. Attendees share ideas and resources toward a common goal of strengthening science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, education throughout North Carolina at the K-12 and college levels.

The fifth annual edition of Bridging the Gap will be held Oct. 25-26, 2016, at the McKimmon Conference & Training Center in Raleigh. Since 2012, more than 1,440 educators, thought leaders, policymakers, industry representatives and others have attended from 81 North Carolina counties and 20 states. The Biogen Foundation is the presenting sponsor of this year’s conference.

NCABR is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization founded in 1989 by the leaders in North Carolina’s bioscience research community. NCABR’s members and supporters include academia, industry, government, nonprofit research organizations and professional societies.

The mission of the Biogen Foundation is to provide access to science education and essential human services to children and their families in the communities in which Biogen operates. The Foundation is committed to sparking a passion for science and discovery, supporting effective science education initiatives, and strengthening efforts to make science education and science careers accessible to diverse populations. The Foundation seeks to inspire the next generation of scientists who will tackle the challenging issues of tomorrow. It wants young people to know that science is fun, science is for everyone, and that they can change the world through science.

More information about:

 

NCABR media contact

Suzanne Wilkison

NCABR President

swilkison@ncabr.org

919.785.1304 x 207

 

Biogen Foundation media contact

Gena Renfrow

North Carolina Administrator

gena.renfrow@biogen.com

919.993.6023

 

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Annual Board of Directors Meeting (cont.)

The North Carolina Association for Biomedical Research announces the appointment of 12 members to its Board of Directors, all unanimously approved at the June 15 annual meeting at Duke University.

Newly Elected Board Members (three-year terms):

Dr. Mladen Vouk, Department Head and Distinguished Professor, Department of Computer Science; Associate Vice Chancellor for Research Development; Director, NC State Data Science Initiative; NC State University

Dr. Marlena Westcott, Assistant Professor in Microbiology & Immunology, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Wake Forest Baptist Health

Re-elected Board Members (three-year terms):

Dr. Ruben Carbonell, Frank Hawkins Kenan Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering; Director, Golden LEAF Biomanufacturing Training and Education Center; Director, Kenan Institute; NC State University

Dr. Mark Clemens, Professor, Department of Biology, UNC Charlotte

Dr. Chris Duffrin, Educational Specialist and Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University

Dr. Craig Fletcher, Director, Division of Laboratory Animal Medicine; Assistant Dean for Animal Research Resources; Associate Professor, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine; UNC Chapel Hill

Dr. Tonya Hargett, Director for Undergraduate Research, Division of Research and Economic Development, NC A&T State University

Dr. Ronald Hines, Associate Director for Health, Office of Research & Development, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Dr. Robert Lindbergh, Vice President, Science & Technology Development Program, North Carolina Biotechnology Center

Ms. Linda McNally, IACUC Chair; Lecturer, Department of Biology; Davidson College

Dr. Mitchell Picker, Professor, Department of Psychology; IACUC Chair; UNC Chapel Hill

Dr. Michael Van Scott, Interim Vice Chancellor, Division of Research, Economic Development and Engagement; Chief Research Officer; East Carolina University

The following Executive Committee members were elected to one-year terms at the June 15 meeting:

Dr. John Norton, Professor of Pathology; University Veterinarian; Director, Division of Laboratory Animal Resources; Duke University (Chair)

Dr. Chris Duffrin, Educational Specialist and Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University (Vice-Chair, Chair-Elect)

Dr. Tonya Hargett, Director for Undergraduate Research, Division of Research and Economic Development, NC A&T State University (Treasurer)

Ms. Colleen Bennett, Oversight and Outreach Manager, Office of Research, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University (Secretary)

Dr. Jeff Everitt, Professor of Pathology, Clinical Services, Duke University

Dr. Craig Fletcher, Director, Division of Laboratory Animal Medicine; Assistant Dean for Animal Research Resources; Associate Professor, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine; UNC Chapel Hill

Dr. Kathy Laber, Chief, Comparative Medicine Branch; Attending Veterinarian; Animal Program Director; NIEHS

Dr. Michael Van Scott, Interim Vice Chancellor; Division of Research, Economic Development and Engagement; Chief Research Officer; East Carolina University

Dr. Mladen Vouk, Department Head and Distinguished Professor, Department of Computer Science; Associate Vice Chancellor for Research Development; Director, NC State Data Science Initiative; NC State University

A complete listing of the NCABR Board of Directors can be found at www.ncabr.org/about/board/.

Recent Activities: Three I’s & Biosecurity Conference

More than 135 researchers, security professionals and others attended NCABR’s Three I’s & Biosecurity conference, held April 13-15 in Chapel Hill, in partnership with the Massachusetts Society for Medical Research, the FBI Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate and PRIM&R.

The audience represented 61 public and private universities, government, nonprofit research and bioscience institutions from 26 states, D.C. and the country of Georgia.

Special thanks to NCABR members UNC-Chapel Hill, the N.C. Biotechnology Center and N.C. Central University for sponsoring the program, which addressed the emerging and complex challenges that touch the IACUC, IBC and IRB communities — issues relating to nanotechnology, CRISPR technology, importing/exporting and much, much more. Additional topics covered at the conference included dual use, Common Rule revisions, conflict of interest and research integrity.

Additional conference sponsors were  Abbvie and Key Solutions.

Special thanks to the following NCABR members for presenting at the conference:

Charlotte H. Coley, MACT, CIP
Training Coordinator
Office of Human Research Ethics—IRB
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Debra L. Hunt, DRPH, CBSP
Director, Biological Safety Division
Occupational and Environmental Safety Office
Assistant Professor
Duke University

Jennifer Kuzma, Ph.D.
Goodnight-NC GSK Foundation Distinguished Professor
Co-Director, Genetic Engineering and Society Program
School of Public and International Affairs
North Carolina State University

Daniel Nelson
Director, Human Research Protocol Office (HRPO)
National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL)
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Jody Power, M.S., MBA, CIP
Executive Director
Institutional Review Board
Duke University Health System

David B. Resnik, J.D., Ph.D.
Bioethicist and IRB Chair
National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences
National Institutes of Health

Marley Thrasher
Manager, Training and Communications
Office of Research, Innovation and Economic Development
Sponsored Programs and Regulatory Compliance Services
North Carolina State University

Daniel Vick
Export Control Compliance Administrator
Office of Sponsored Programs and Regulatory Compliance Services
North Carolina State University

Kathleen M. Vogel, Ph.D.
Director, Science, Technology and Society Program
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science
North Carolina State University